JOHNSON SAKAJA: THE BOY WHO HELD A ONE MAN DEMONSTRATION AT THE AGE OF FIVE

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IN the sprawling suburb of Ngara Estate in Nairobi, a young boy was growing with a remarkable degree of intelligence, wisdom and discipline. His early leadership traits mesmerized even his own parents. His name: Johnson Sakaja.

At the age of five, his father had decided to make him spend another year in pre-school, an idea that the young boy strongly opposed. To the shock of his dad, Sakaja held a one man protest in the house, with a placard he had written, ‘ No Class One, No School’. His father obliged. He reported to standard One at Aga Khan Primary School. His political career was born.

Sakaja was a bright student at Aga Khan Primary. His exemplary performances, gifted oratorical skills, discipline and hard work, made him to be elevated to the position of school head boy. His leadership skills, potential and talent became more evident. It’s while at Aga Khan primary school that the young Sakaja won the UNICEF International Children Debate, and a trophy handed to him by the then Minister for Environment, the late Francis Nyenze. He proceeded to Lenana High schools, where he scored clean A’s.

His mother – an athletic champion herself- died when Sakaja was just nine years. Before her demise, she had predicted that the boy would be a great leader in Kenya. From a lone protester in the house; a primary school head boy; a SONU leader at the University; chairman of a national party, to a Senator of the Capital City County, Sakaja’s rise to the position of Nairobi Governor is now an inescapable inevitability.

Johnson Sakaja