Worst Business to Do in Kenya

Worst Business to Do in Kenya

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In this highly evolving world, business is a golden thing for people who are aiming the sky. More often we tend to take risks that are not worth our time and end up regretting. For instance, there are business we can describe as worse, which if you start pursuing them, you will end up losing your fortune.

In Kenya, the following are businesses you should not give a try, unless you know how to manipulate people, authority and the political class

  1. Matatu Business

You may see your friends succeeding in Matatu business, but if you take time to know what they are going through, you won’t follow their footsteps.

When you front the idea of matatu business, the police start salivating,NTSA will start warming up, your driver and conductor will see a gold mine while the touts will be waiting for their share. If a matatu rakes in Ksh6,000,you will end up pocketing only Ksh2,000,which means you are feeding a crowd from your own sweat.

  1. Selling wedding dresses

Don’t venture into wedding dresses business unless you are exporting your products. In Kenya, less than 10,000 people wed annually, meaning you will have quite discouraging orders from clients. Since this sector has big players, it’s hard for a new entrant to break through.

  1. Selling second hand cars

About 5 years ago second hand car business was highly profitable, but over time people started being cautious about where to purchase cars from-this resulted from cases involving car theft. It was found that criminals had connections with car sellers where they sold stolen cars at a throw away price after repainting them.

Nowadays people trust old players in the motor industry.

  1. Cyber Café

Cyber Café has been overtaken by time. Only less than 5% of Kenyans use cyber café in the modern Kenya. If you are dumb enough, open a cyber café and see the consequences

  1. Bookshop

Nowadays people buy books online, in fact they read online. There is no need of opening a bookshop when everyone else is considering closing their bookshops.

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